Cover for the book 500 Raku

    500 Raku

    My art is featured in the book 500 Raku  which is published by Lark Books.


    You can order a copy of this groundbreaking new entry in the highly successful 500 book series from the following:



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    Welcome to Pieces of Art


    A Passion for Art and Design: The Diverse Artist Palette


    Photo of Marilyn Proctor-Givens I have a love affair with jigsaw puzzles, screen printing, graphic design, clay, and 3D printing. When I was a young child, my parents would buy me jigsaw puzzles as gifts. One reason I love jigsaw puzzles is because of the challenge of solving a problem that has a definite solution. There is nothing like seeing a finished masterpiece in front of you. The second reason I fell in love with jigsaw puzzle pieces is because of the process involved in putting a puzzle together. This process reminds of my rich life journey. When you work on a puzzle you make connections. I see myself making connections to people, resources, places, and things in this world daily. Sometimes the connections are permanent and sometimes just temporary. I first learned to silkscreen in high school and fell in love with the possibility of making copies of a design and sharing it with my family. After high school, I majored in graphic design and art education. In college I learned to screen print on paper and silk. My desire to silkscreen continues now, however the message is now spiritual-based and centers around the inspiration of living in great city of Tallahassee.


    My artwork is a marriage between graphic design and ceramics. My fascination and curiosity with spherical works occurred in college, when I was creating a drawing for an animation. I was unable to visualize the inside walls of an object as it rotated. So I decided to physically make the object using clay. After that experience, the spherical clay form became my new 3D graphic clay canvas. Many of my spherical works play around with color, texture, pattern, and other surface decorations such as the 16th century Japanese firing technique called Raku. After my trip to Ghana in Africa, the symbolism and adornment I discovered from my travels became another added focus in my work. The 3D printer is yet another amazing tool that I have added to my diverse artist palette.



    Pedagogy: Developing Lifetime Learners


    Change has come to my classroom over the past 30 years and I have had become that innovative curriculum chameleon. Teachers need a voice and a clear means of expressing what they do and how it can help students begin to decide what they want to do in the future. Just as the chameleon changes colors, overtime I have adapted my classroom and curriculum to help prepare my students for careers that are now available in the arts and technology based fields. As an art and design teacher, I have had to build a curriculum that suits the needs of the individual students' strengths, as well as help them develop collaborative innovative problem solving skills. Collaborative project based learning provides students with rich practical experiences that can be transferred across other disciplines. Students are actively gaining graphic design, screen printing, and 3D printing skills, while also challenging themselves to achieve Adobe certifications in the leading industry based graphic design software. Once students gain the design skills, they transfer these skills to the production level. When you walk into my visually stimulating classroom, you immediately see students working together and utilizing all of our vast resources to develop projects for themselves, our schools and the community.



    Raku Fire, Image 1
    Raku Fire, Image 2
    Raku Fire, Image 3



    About My T-Shirts


    Silk Screen Rig I first learned to silkscreen in high school and fell in love with the possibility of making copies of a design and sharing it with my family.  My first t-shirt design paid homage to my birth home Oklahoma, yes (where the wind comes sweeping down the plain).  After high school, I majored in art and learned to make prints on paper and silk. My desire to silkscreen on t-shirt continued, however the message was spiritual-based.  My sister and I created several designs and started printing them in our parents' garage in 1994.



    Today, the operation continues with some of the same designs as well as a few new ones.  On my trip to Ghana, Africa in the Summer of 2007, I learned about the Adinkra symbols used by artist to print on fabric and other objects in their culture.  These powerful symbols reflect meanings about God, faith, and other important life lessons.  I am currently combining the Adinkra symbols of Africa with the word of God as an expression of faith.


    Marilyn Proctor-Givens,
    Owner, Operator